I think that the boat has set sail on me ever reaching the Paralympic Games.


Or has it….?


If you’ve ever heard of Reg Harris of Manchester Wheelers, you’d know that in 1948 he took 2 Silver Medals at the summer Olympic Games, he also took a British track title at the age of 54. 

Reg sadly passed away at the age of 72 having suffered a stroke.


In fairness, Reg was arguably one of the cycling greats at the velodrome.


Yes theirs an argument to say that, if Reg was competing to today’s standards then things might have been different. 

That we’ll never know.…


I suspect that he’d be equally as good if not better because, he too would have today’s technology available.


Then when you look at people like Eddie Merckx, nicknamed the cannibal who is badged as being the greatest track and road cyclist that the word has ever seen. 


Joseph Merckx, Baron Merckx
, (born June 17, 1945, Meensel-Kiezegem, Belgium), Belgian champion bicycle racer, arguably the greatest professional rider ever. In a professional career stretching from 1965 to 1978, he recorded 445 victories in 1,585 races. During his peak years (1969–75), he won some 35 percent of the races he entered. Because the focus of the sport has become specialized since Merckx’s era—the stars of one-day classics do not usually shine in multiday stage races, and vice versa—nobody is likely to approach his total wins. He was nicknamed “the Cannibal” for his voracious appetite for victories.

Now I’m 46 years old, I too have been a top cyclist, not to the same standard as Harris or Merckx but, I do know what’s required to get their. 

As you’ve all seen, I’m thoroughly enjoying my return to cycling. In fact I will be returning to competitive cycling next year. I’m currently in the process of trying to find a cycling club that will accommodate a recumbent trike.


I have actually written to a couple today to see what they say so, watch this space.


I always felt that being disabled means that life grinds to a halt. 


“Now I absolutely disagree with that statement”.

Being disabled has meant that I’ve been able to find myself again, I’m achieving things now that I wouldn’t of even dreamt of prior to my accident and, long may it continue.